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1/13/10 / Naphta

Song of the day

Staind’s It’s been a while:

And it’s been a while
Since I could hold my head up high
And it’s been a while since I first saw you
And it’s been a while since I could stand on my own two feet again
And it’s been a while since I could call you

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem
The consequences that I’ve rendered
I’ve stretched myself beyond my means

It’s been awhile
Since I can say that I wasn’t addicted
And it’s been a while since I can say I love myself as well and
And it’s been a while since I’ve gone and fucked things up just like I always do
And it’s been a while but all that shit seems to disappear when I’m with you

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem
The consequences that I’ve rendered
I’ve gone and fucked things up again

Why must I feel this way?
Just make this go away
Just one more peaceful day

And it’s been a while
Since I could look at myself straight
And it’s been a while since I said I’m sorry
And it’s been a while since I’ve seen the way the candles light your face
And it’s been a while but I can still remember just the way you taste

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem to be
I know it’s me
I cannot blame this on my father
He did the best he could for me

And it’s been a while
Since I could hold my head up high
And it’s been a while since I said I’m sorry


Thomas Mann on science

[abp:0679772871]

But things got even worse when he turned to science – in which he did not believe. He did not believe in it, he said, for every man was perfectly free to believe in it or not. It was a faith like any other, only worse and more obtuse than all the rest; and the word “science” itself was the expression of the most stupid sort of realism, which did not blush at taking at face value the dubious reflections that objects left on the human mind and seeing them as the basis for the most dismal and vapid dogma anyone ever foisted on humanity. Was not the very idea of a world of senses that existed in and of itself the most ridiculous of all possible self-contradictions? But as a dogma, modern natural science lived exclusively and solely from the metaphysical assumption that the forms by which we recognize and organize reality – space, time, causality – reflect a real state of affairs existing independent of our knowledge. That monistic claim was the most naked piece of effrontery the Spirit had ever had to endure. Space, time, and causality – in monistic terms that meant evolutions. And there you had the central dogma of atheistic freethinkers and their pseudo-religion, which presumed to abolish the Book of Genesis and replace it with a stultifying fable of enlightened knowledge, as if Haeckel had been present at the creation of the earth. Empiricism? The ether of space – that was exact, was it? The atom, that nice little mathematical joke, “the smallest, indivisible particle” – proved, was it? The theory of infinite space and time – that was definitely based on experience, was it? Indeed, with just a modicum of logic, one could achieve very amusing results from the dogma of infinite space and time – to wit: nothing.

The Magic Mountain, pg. 681

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