Skip navigation

5/16/09 / Pierce

Written yesterday, Friday 5/15/09, 8:26 AM

It’s Day 2 without the internet, and I feel crippled. I’m not addicted to Facebook or Twitter (I’m not even on those services), but I need to check e-mail to communicate with clients and get work done. Now, I’m not some big corporate hot shot that my world falls apart if my Blackberry stops working for 15 minutes. I can manage for another few days without the internet, but I would much rather lose the phone than the internet. Communication with prospective clients and, more importantly, current clients, is on hold until I’m back online.

For the past few months I had a deal with my next door neighbor to piggyback on his wireless network in exchange for half his internet service cost. It was a win-win for both of us: I save the hassle of creating a new account and he gets some extra money. He moved yesterday and obviously took his internet with him. I went around at various times yesterday, knocking on a few neighboring doors trying to find out who owns a certain wireless network, but with no luck yet, so it seems I’ll have to make a deal with the devil (Comcast) and sign up directly. I did leave a note under two doors I suspect might own that network, to contact me if they do own it and want to share and split costs, so we’ll see if I get any calls or knocks on the door today.

So for now, I sit, and I wait.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

5/13/09 / Greasy

11:50 AM Every time I drive now, down a highway separated by that double yellow line with its periodic breaks, I’ve been thinking about those people whose job it is to decide just where to start and end those breaks. Their decision could mean life or death for some eager overtaker in a hurry, yet how many of us have actually thought about that specific job before?

Photo by davidwallphoto.com

Photo from davidwallphoto.com

Whoever’s job it is has to stand there and consider several factors, such as:

  • speed limit on the highway
  • actual speed on the highway
  • visibility ahead in fair weather
  • visibility ahead in poor weather
  • shoulder width on either side

After keeping all these in mind, that special person has to decide whether they’re going to draw a single dashed line, one dashed and one solid line, or a double solid line in that spot. Then he or she has to decide where the line will change, and to what. It’s a time-consuming job I imagine.

Tags: , , , , , ,

5/12/09 / Tail

8:50 PM I’ve been wanting to pay respect to some of my favorite products – material goods that do what they’re meant to do and do it very well, and for very long. For example:

Timberland boots

These here are my trusty Timberland boots. I bought these in 1999 in Bakersfield, CA, for $99. Since then they’ve moved around with me everywhere I’ve gone, and have tirelessly served me in sand, snow, mud, rain, slush, and anything else Mother Nature has thrown at me. They even went to India with me, where they had the distinct pleasure of walking over the world’s highest motorable pass, and stroll through the beautiful Valley of Flowers National Park, among other places. It’s been almost ten years and they’re still going strong.

This here is perhaps my favorite component on my bicycle: the pedal. The Time ATAC pedals have been on my bike since 2003, and they have probably seen more abuse than any other component – hitting rocks and logs frequently. Never once have I even had to think about them, let alone do anything about them. They’re just that good.

What else…I’ll think and come back with other products I admire.

9:44 AM From The Snow Leopard:

Amazingly, we take for granted that instinct for survival, fear of death, must separate us from the happiness of pure and uninterpreted experience, in which body, mind, and nature are the same. And this debasement of our vision, the retreat from wonder, the backing away like lobsters from free-swimming life into safe crannies, the desperate instinct that our life passes unlived, is reflected in proliferation without joy, corrosive money rot, the gross befouling of the earth and air and water from which we came.

Compare the wild, free paintings of the child with the stiff, pinched “pictures” these become as the painter notices the painting and tries to portray “reality” as others see it; self-conscious now, he steps out of his own painting and, finding himself apart from things, notices the silence all around and becomes alarmed by the vast significations of Creation. The armor of the “I” begins to form, the construction and desperate assertion of separate identity, the loneliness: “Man has closed himself up, till he sees all things through the narrow chinks of his cavern.”

-Pg. 42

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

5/09/09 / Spike